top of page
us today.JPG
aaa.JPG
abc.JPG
2.JPG
BI.JPG
999.JPG
tr.JPG
1a.JPG
sk.JPG
cr123.JPG
dallas.png
boss.JPG
33.JPG
Seattle Times
USA Today
Raeder
RD.JPG

Don't let a headache over how much to tip at the nail salon ruin the fun of getting your next manicure. We've done the math for you!

Getting a mani-pedi is a great way to lift your mood and practice self-care. Add in a little hand and foot massage, and it’s also an ideal way to relax and de-stress—that is, until it comes time to pay the bill and figure out how much to tip. Trying to figure out how much to tip at the nail salon can be really confusing, and instead of focusing on how to make your manicure last longer, you’re stuck trying to do mental math.

It’s OK—we’ve got you! We asked etiquette experts, nail techs and salon owners to share exactly when, who and how much to tip at nail salons. Once you’re up to speed, make sure you know the proper tipping etiquette in other situations, from how much to tip your hairdresser to how much to tip hotel housekeeping.

 

 

How much should you tip at the nail salon?

Fifteen to 20% of the total bill is the industry standard for how much to tip a nail tech, but this can vary between countries, regions and salons, says Sharon-Frances Moore, president of Shances, a New York–based etiquette company. Not only that, but tipping amounts have changed drastically over the past two years. “During the COVID-19 pandemic, to help ease the financial strain of workers, there was an increase of people over-tipping for services in industries across the board,” says Moore. “We are now seeing an adjustment back to standard tipping, which for a nail technician, [regardless] of the service, is around 15 to 20%.”

Read more

ABC
Business Insder
Cane river
Eventbrite OPERA cards (34).png
Monster
999.JPG
Kiss
Screen Shot 2020-10-09 at 4.54.34 AM.png

Face-to-face interviews are sometimes replaced with automated interviews — A “one-way” interview is a common employer request these days, says Sharon-Frances Moore, president of Shances, an etiquette and corporate conduct coaching business in New York. “One-way interviews that use pre-taped questions and webcams to record answers places the interviewee at a disadvantage,” Moore says. “This method of interviewing does not allow the interviewee to read the interviewer’s reactions to their questions. Interviewer cues such as body language and tone changes can help the interviewee determine how they can adjust their answers to get a better outcome. Simply put, one-way interviews make it impossible to “vibe with the interviewer.”

The Rest
She knows
Best Life
22.JPG
123.JPG
456.JPG
BL.JPG
Essence
BOSsS.jpg
sharon-francis-moore-host-of-conference.jpg

Pictured above: Shances taeching at Essence Of A Boss

Screenshot (5)_edited.jpg

Ask a flight attendant for help

If a baby doesn’t stop screaming, you can ask the parent to intervene (usually a terrible idea since the parents are already doing everything they can to make the baby stop), or you can appeal to a flight attendant. “Flight attendants are trained to assess in-flight issues and problem-solve,” says Sharon-Frances Moore, who runs a social etiquette company. The best solution may be to move you to a different seat, if available. 

Read More

Dallas
bottom of page